Editor

Kathleen P. Hunt

Proceedings Title

Understanding the Role of Trust and Credibility in Science Communication

Description

Identifying the determinants of success in communicating scientific information for use in policymaking has been a topic of longstanding interest for many fields. Perceptions of message and messenger credibility are recognized in many disciplines as key to information receptivity, and subsequent changes in attitudes, by decision-makers. Bias also appears as a component of credibility, but is not theoretically well-defined, and its effects can appear inconsistent. This study—comprised of interviews with congressional staff members with energy, environment, and science portfolios (n=16)—finds that perceptions of bias and expertise play a critical role in the way in which policymakers evaluate scientific information sources, building on early research on credibility and opinion change.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/sciencecommunication-181114-18

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Who Isn’t Biased? Perceived Bias as a Dimension of Credibility in Communication of Science with Policymakers

Identifying the determinants of success in communicating scientific information for use in policymaking has been a topic of longstanding interest for many fields. Perceptions of message and messenger credibility are recognized in many disciplines as key to information receptivity, and subsequent changes in attitudes, by decision-makers. Bias also appears as a component of credibility, but is not theoretically well-defined, and its effects can appear inconsistent. This study—comprised of interviews with congressional staff members with energy, environment, and science portfolios (n=16)—finds that perceptions of bias and expertise play a critical role in the way in which policymakers evaluate scientific information sources, building on early research on credibility and opinion change.

 

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