Editor

Kathleen P. Hunt

Proceedings Title

Understanding the Role of Trust and Credibility in Science Communication

Description

This paper investigates trust and credibility issues raised by Environmental Non-Government Organisations (ENGOs) in Vietnam working to reduce demand for rhino horn. The ENGOs selected scientific information of rhino horn’s keratin composition, which is similar to fingernails, but excluded from their media outputs Asian scientific studies results supporting the horn’s medicinal value. This paper argues that the keratin/fingernail messaging created trust and credibility issues because it competed with an existing science frame in Asia, which defers to the science of traditional medicine, and excluded discussion of an institutionalized division in scientific opinion concerning rhino horn’s worth as a medicine.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/sciencecommunication-181114-7

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Credibility and Trust Issues Stemming from an Ambiguous Science Frame: Reducing Demand for Rhino Horn in Vietnam with the Fingernail Metaphor

This paper investigates trust and credibility issues raised by Environmental Non-Government Organisations (ENGOs) in Vietnam working to reduce demand for rhino horn. The ENGOs selected scientific information of rhino horn’s keratin composition, which is similar to fingernails, but excluded from their media outputs Asian scientific studies results supporting the horn’s medicinal value. This paper argues that the keratin/fingernail messaging created trust and credibility issues because it competed with an existing science frame in Asia, which defers to the science of traditional medicine, and excluded discussion of an institutionalized division in scientific opinion concerning rhino horn’s worth as a medicine.

 

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