Major(s)

Marketing

Mentor(s)

Samantha Cross

Department

Marketing

Location

Memorial Union, South Ballroom

Session Title

Poster Presentations

Start Date

HH-11-4-2017

End Date

HH-11-4-2017

Description

Discussions about diversity typically focus on issues surrounding ethnicity, race or culture. This project takes a different perspective and examines the impact of diverse preferences, philosophical and belief systems, within the context of individual and household food consumption. In Phase 1 of the project, the focus is on individual food preferences and perceptions of others’ food preferences. Phase 2 then examines spouses and partnerships (heterosexual and same sex) within the household, where one partner has a firm or flexible preference for particular types of foods and the other partner does not share that food preference or philosophy. Ultimately, this research will help us better understand contemporary perceptions about food preferences and marketplace categorizations.

This first phase of the project, and the focus of this research paper, revolves around a key research question: How do consumer perceptions and categorizations of food options for meal selections converge and vary based on food preference or philosophy? To answer this question, the authors will develop an online consumer survey and card sorting exercise, where participants are asked general demographic and lifestyle questions, including whether or not they identify with a particular food preference category. Each participant also groups various food items into a “food plate” based on their perceptions of what those ideal food choices would be for breakfast, lunch and dinner, for an individual falling under each of the following categories: omnivore, vegetarian, vegan, gluten sensitive. Preliminary research indicates that individual perceptions of what constitutes an ideal meal, irrespective of food preference, has an underlying common structure, based on societal norms, which can prove challenging. Perceptions of what constitutes a typical vegetarian versus a vegan meal, for example, are also expected to vary based on the food philosophies of the individual participants.

Included in

Marketing Commons

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Apr 11th, 3:00 PM Apr 11th, 5:00 PM

Consumer Perceptions of Diverse Food Preferences: A Card-Sorting Exercise

Memorial Union, South Ballroom

Discussions about diversity typically focus on issues surrounding ethnicity, race or culture. This project takes a different perspective and examines the impact of diverse preferences, philosophical and belief systems, within the context of individual and household food consumption. In Phase 1 of the project, the focus is on individual food preferences and perceptions of others’ food preferences. Phase 2 then examines spouses and partnerships (heterosexual and same sex) within the household, where one partner has a firm or flexible preference for particular types of foods and the other partner does not share that food preference or philosophy. Ultimately, this research will help us better understand contemporary perceptions about food preferences and marketplace categorizations.

This first phase of the project, and the focus of this research paper, revolves around a key research question: How do consumer perceptions and categorizations of food options for meal selections converge and vary based on food preference or philosophy? To answer this question, the authors will develop an online consumer survey and card sorting exercise, where participants are asked general demographic and lifestyle questions, including whether or not they identify with a particular food preference category. Each participant also groups various food items into a “food plate” based on their perceptions of what those ideal food choices would be for breakfast, lunch and dinner, for an individual falling under each of the following categories: omnivore, vegetarian, vegan, gluten sensitive. Preliminary research indicates that individual perceptions of what constitutes an ideal meal, irrespective of food preference, has an underlying common structure, based on societal norms, which can prove challenging. Perceptions of what constitutes a typical vegetarian versus a vegan meal, for example, are also expected to vary based on the food philosophies of the individual participants.