Major(s)

Hahn: Nutritional Science; Coonts: Dietetics; Reed: Kinesiology and Health

Mentor(s)

Kevin Schalinske

Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Location

Memorial Union, South Ballroom

Session Title

Poster Presentations

Start Date

HH-11-4-2017

End Date

HH-11-4-2017

Description

Obesity is a national epidemic that can increase an individual's risk for a multitude of health complications, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). In individuals already diagnosed with the disease, even small amounts of weight loss can help prevent diabetic complications. Due to the relationship between obesity and T2D, and the link between obesity and diet, a better understanding of how dietary factors affect those with T2D is necessary. Currently, the consumption of whole eggs by those with T2D is controversial. Here, we investigated the relationship between the consumption of whole eggs and obesity in both a genetic-mediated and diet-induced (i.e., high fat feeding) T2D obese rat model. The genetic T2D model fed a whole egg-based diet exhibited a 40% decrease in weight gain, as well as a 4-5% decrease in total body fat. Similarly, the diet-induced T2D model showed a 22% decrease in weight gain in response to the consumption of whole egg. While egg consumption was without effect on the control rats in both studies. Therefore, we have shown that whole egg consumption is an effective dietary strategy to attenuate the obese phenotype in both a diet-induced and a genetic rat model of type 2 diabetes.

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Apr 11th, 3:00 PM Apr 11th, 5:00 PM

Whole Egg Consumption Attenuates Weight Gain in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rats

Memorial Union, South Ballroom

Obesity is a national epidemic that can increase an individual's risk for a multitude of health complications, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). In individuals already diagnosed with the disease, even small amounts of weight loss can help prevent diabetic complications. Due to the relationship between obesity and T2D, and the link between obesity and diet, a better understanding of how dietary factors affect those with T2D is necessary. Currently, the consumption of whole eggs by those with T2D is controversial. Here, we investigated the relationship between the consumption of whole eggs and obesity in both a genetic-mediated and diet-induced (i.e., high fat feeding) T2D obese rat model. The genetic T2D model fed a whole egg-based diet exhibited a 40% decrease in weight gain, as well as a 4-5% decrease in total body fat. Similarly, the diet-induced T2D model showed a 22% decrease in weight gain in response to the consumption of whole egg. While egg consumption was without effect on the control rats in both studies. Therefore, we have shown that whole egg consumption is an effective dietary strategy to attenuate the obese phenotype in both a diet-induced and a genetic rat model of type 2 diabetes.