Campus Units

Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

9-2004

Journal or Book Title

Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Volume

70

Issue

9

First Page

5331

Last Page

5335

DOI

10.1128/AEM.70.9.5331-5335.2004

Abstract

Escherichia coli O157:H7 is only occasionally isolated from healthy swine, but some experimentally infected animals will shed the organism in their feces for at least 2 months. Potential explanations for the paucity of naturally occurring infections in swine, as compared to cattle, include a lack of animal-to-animal transmission so that the organism cannot be maintained within a herd, a high infectious dose, or herd management practices that prevent the maintenance of the organism in the gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that donor pigs infected with E. coli O157:H7 would transmit the organism to naïve pigs. We also determined the infectious dose and whether housing pigs individually on grated floors would decrease the magnitude or duration of fecal shedding. Infected donor pigs shedding <104 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 per g transmitted the organism to 6 of 12 naïve pigs exposed to them. The infectious dose of E. coli O157:H7 for 3-month-old pigs was approximately 6 × 103 CFU. There was no difference in the magnitude and duration of fecal shedding by pigs housed individually on grates compared to those housed two per pen on cement floors. These results suggest that swine do not have an innate resistance to colonization by E. coli O157:H7 and that they could serve as a reservoir host under suitable conditions.

Comments

This article is from Applied and Environmental Microbiology 70 (2004): 5331, doi:10.1128/AEM.70.9.5331-5335.2004. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

American Society for Microbiology

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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