Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

5-2003

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

Volume

17

Issue

3

First Page

273

Last Page

281

DOI

10.1111/j.1939-1676.2003.tb02448.x

Abstract

Vaccine adjuvants are chemicals, microbial components, or mammalian proteins that enhance the immune response to vaccine antigens. Interest in reducing vaccine-related adverse effects and inducing specific types of immunity has led to the development of numerous new adjuvants. Adjuvants in development or in experimental and commercial vaccines include aluminum salts (alum), oil emulsions, saponins, immune-stimulating complexes (ISCOMs), liposomes, microparticles, nonionic block copolymers, deriv-atized polysaccharides, cytokines, and a wide variety of bacterial derivatives. The mechanisms of action of these diverse compounds vary, as does their induction of cell-mediated and antibody responses. Factors influencing the selection of an adjuvant include animal species, specific pathogen, vaccine antigen, route of immunization, and type of immunity needed.

Comments

This article is from Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 17 (2003): 273, doi:10.1111/j.1939-1676.2003.tb02448.x. Posted with permission.

Rights

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Copyright Owner

Anna R. Spickler and James A. Roth

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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