Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2003

Journal or Book Title

International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents

Volume

22

First Page

465

Last Page

478

DOI

10.1016/S0924-8579(03)00180-8

Abstract

Domesticated animals have a large variety of antimicrobial peptides that serve as natural innate barriers limiting microbial infection or, in some instances, act as an integral component in response to inflammation or microbial infection. These peptides differ in size, composition, mechanisms of activity and range of antimicrobial specificities. They are expressed in many tissues, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages and mucosal epithelial cells. There is a small group of anionic antimicrobial peptides found in ruminants and a much larger group of cationic antimicrobial peptides found in all domesticated animals. The cationic peptides include linear, helical peptides, linear peptides rich in proline and cysteine-stabilized peptides with a b-sheet and are commonly referred to as cathelicidins and defensins. These peptides are generally broad-spectrum for Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi (e.g. myeloid antimicrobial peptides, a-, b-defensins, and protegrins) or are specific to one of these groups (e.g. porcine cecropin P1, Bac5, Bac7, PR-39 and prophenin).

Comments

This article is from International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents 22 (2003): 465–478, doi:10.1016/S0924-8579(03)00180-8.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS